Matching You With Free Plans For Building a Compost Bin!

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Compost Tumbler
How to Compost
 

 

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Free Plans For Building a Compost Bin

I found my compost tumbler to not have the capacity needed for all my lawn clippings.  With close to an acre of lawn that grows like a hay field, I get a lot of clippings.  So I decided to rebuild my bins a little bigger and also use my compost tumbler.  The compost bin shown here will last you from 5 to 6 years and it costs nearly nothing to build since you make it out of slab wood ends that lumber operations give away free to the public.  If you want a compost bin to last longer, use cedar boards in place of the slab wood and cedar 2-by-4's.  Cedar can be pricey however. One can also use treated wood but I don't fancy having chemical anti-mold treatments mixing with compost used in my vegetable garden.

Here are the instructions for building these compost bins:

  1. Obtain a half truck load or so of slab wood from a logging operation.  This is generally given away free.


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  2. Obtain (6)  36"-40" pieces of 2-by-4 and cut all of them to a uniform length. I cut mine to 40".


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  3. Cut 48" lengths of the slab wood ends, lay them out uniformly on the 2-by-4's, and for now fasten each piece with one nail on each side.  Use galvanized #8 or #10 box nails.  These 3 assembled pieces will make up the sides.


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  4. Move assembled side pieces to a bench or sawhorse set, square up the pieces, and fasten each side with several more box nails.


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  5. Move the side pieces to where you will build your compost bin. If you have a metal shed like mine, you can use the shed for the back of the bin.  If you have a wood shed, you will want to place a piece of plywood at the back to protect your shed from rotting.  Fasten a 2-by-2 on the top back and fasten the 2-by-2 to your shed. Take measurements and fasten a full length of slab wood to the front bottom. It is helpful to place a base of loose gravel where the side pieces will be secured in place.

    compost bin
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  6. Temporarily fasten slab wood pieces across the front with one galvanized deck screw per side. This is an easy way to build the front doors.

    compost bins
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  7. Fasten 4 vertical pieces of slab wood on the insides of the front pieces. It is easiest to use exterior deck screws. These vertical pieces will hold the entire front together when you remove the temporary screws.

    compost bin
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  8. After you have figured out how you will hinge the doors on (I used some old door hinges), mark where you will cut the front pieces.  Take the entire front off , and cut your doors to size.  A chain saw works nice for this.  Attach your doors to the sides with hinges.

    compost bins
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    As can be seen below (and above), I have the doors attached with hinges on each side.  The doors latch over the middle with several old chains.


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    The left and right hinges are shown below.  Also the chains for latching in the middle are shown.  Note the use of drain tube in the bottom to help keep air at the bottom of the compost pile.
     

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This bin will last you from 5 to 6 years.  If you want one to last longer, use cedar boards in place of the slab wood and cedar 2-by-4's.  Cedar can be pricey however. One can also use treated wood but I don't fancy having chemical anti-mold treatments mixing with compost used in my vegetable garden.


Use compost, not farmer's manure!  Compost does not have the weed seeds in it if you do things right and get the pile to a high temperature. Click Here for instructions on how to make a compost pile that will heat up correctly.

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